Auto Business Consulting Scarborough ME

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Auto Business Consulting. You will find informative articles about Auto Business Consulting, including "10 Ideas to Improve Shop Profitability" and "Profiting From Personal Performance". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Scarborough, ME that can help answer your questions about Auto Business Consulting.

Michael John DellOlio (RFC®), JD, MBA
(207) 294-0401
16 Middle Street
Saco, ME
Company
Michael J. DellOlio & Associates, L.L.C.
Qualifications
Education: B.S.,MBA,J.D.,NASD Series 6,7,24,63,65; Maine Insurance License
Years of Experience: 24
Membership
IARFC
Services
Invoice, Estate Planning, Business Planning, Portfolio Management, Trustee Service, Pension Planning, Retirement Planning, Tax Planning, Tax Returns, Employee Benefits, Stocks and Bonds, Mutual Funds, CD Banking, Annuities, Life Insurance, Disability Income Insurance, Long Term Care Insurance, Medical Insurance, BuySell, Compensation Plans

Data Provided By:
Mr. Dermont Thomas Healey (RFC®), CHFC, CLU, RHU
(207) 871-1538
482 Congress St Ste 503
Portland, ME
Company
Scribner Insurance Agency
Qualifications
Education: BS/Business, Providence College
Years of Experience: 42
Membership
IARFC, MDRT, AALU, SFSP, NAIFA
Services
Invoice, Estate Planning, Business Planning, Retirement Planning, Life Insurance, Disability Income Insurance, Long Term Care Insurance, BuySell

Data Provided By:
Maine SBDC Outreach Office: Rumford (ATDC Manufacturing)
(207) 783-9186
68 High Street, 2nd Floor,P.O. Box 9300
Portland, ME
 
Maine SBDC Outreach Office: Saco
(207) 282-1567
68 High Street, 2nd Floor,P.O. Box 9300
Portland, ME
 
Maine SBDC Outreach Office: South Portland (ATDC Environmental)
(207) 780-4949
68 High Street, 2nd Floor,P.O. Box 9300
Portland, ME
 
Priscilla Hansen
(207) 222-2171
South Portland, ME
Coaching Types
Life, Entrepreneurship, Business
Rates
$75.00-100.00/Hr
Gender
Female
Certifications
CEC, CPC, LPT
Membership Organizations
ACC

Data Provided By:
Deb Bergeron
(207) 797-9007
Falmouth, ME
Coaching Types
Life, Business, Career
Rates
$150/Hr
Gender
Female
Membership Organizations
ACC

Data Provided By:
Maine SBDC
(207) 324-0316
68 High Street, 2nd Floor,P.O. Box 9300
Portland, ME
 
Maine SBDC/SBTDC
(207) 780-4420
96 Falmouth Street
Portland, ME
 
Maine SBDC Outreach Office: Skowhegan
207-453-4258 ext. 16
68 High Street, 2nd Floor,P.O. Box 9300
Portland, ME
 
Data Provided By:

10 Ideas to Improve Shop Profitability

Profitability is the number one concern of shop owners across the country. And, as the cost of ­running a shop continues to escalate, it’s important to always keep your eyes open for ideas you can implement to improve sales, cut costs and make your shop more profitable.

Babcox Research asked a sample of shop owner readers for their ideas on this topic, and we’re sharing their responses below.

1. Survey the competition and see if you can raise prices. Don’t just look at what is advertised in the newspaper; make some phone calls, too.

2. Take care of your customers and teach them about the need to keep their vehicles/engines maintained.

3. Conduct very thorough inspections. Teach employees (especially new hires) how to inspect components during a teardown.

4. Make the extra effort to communicate with customers so they understand the importance of doing the job right.

5. Watch what you spend and stop giving things away. Make sure every item used on a job is billed-out, including “extra” time.

6. Hire good people. Provide and require on-going training.

7. Get the right profit margin and don’t rely on a “suggested” list price.

8. Give the customer what they want because a returning customer will bring in more ­referral business.

9. Actively work your customer contact list/management database to drive traffic to your shop and bring back good customers.

10. Do the work right the first tim...

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Profiting From Personal Performance

I wanted this installment to be different, so I decided to approach it from the angle of “Personal Performance,” which is just another way of saying personal responsibility and how you’re addressing it.

If you’ve been following my articles over the last year, you may be starting to get some new ideas for finding profits in selling high performance engines, parts and accessories.

We’ve discussed various sales techniques to battle internet and catalog parts sales, or “walk-in parts,” as I like to call them. I wrote about strategies and gave them creative names like, “Selling your knowledge,” “Discount for labor” and’ “The package,” just to name a few.

Next I wrote about profit margins and the profit dollars left from the sale after you have paid your supplier for the parts. We talked about taking a reasonably large down payment, taking time to educate yourself about not only your competition, but the latest trends. Remember, you can learn a lot about what the public is being fed about how to do all kinds of modifications and repairs just by studying those news stand magazines that specialize in what you specialize in.

I wanted this installment to be different, so I decided to approach it from the angle of “Personal Performance,” which is just another way of saying personal responsibility and how you’re addressing it. Yes responsibility for you, your family, your business, your employees, your customers, your government, your kids and your future. I feel an inch or two smaller just thinking about the responsibility, but that doesn’t make it go away.

Are you making money? Is it enough so you can hire the help you want? Do you discount your bills? Are you afraid you might lose your building, or do you own a building, but suffer at tax time? How is your equipment looking? Can you afford to update a new piece every year? Your performance every day, as either an owner or as a valuable shop employee, can have bearing on all these things. If you are the owner, then you know where the buck stops!

How you handle people is part of your performance as well. Do customers pay you a little more, but still come back day after day because they like the service you provide? Do your employees generally stay around for many years, or do you turn ’em and burn ’em? Are you an expert in any part of your field? Do you promote that through the business as a shop specialty or as a way to meet customers with similar interests through car clubs and other events?

I have two great examples from phone calls that I received just a few weeks ago. And this time I get to introduce a couple of characters for us to learn from. Here are two different guys, both fighting a common fight in this industry: the fight to survive. One can’t dig deep enough to find answers to his business problems and customer issue...

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