Bearings Saint Joseph MO

Looking for Bearings in Saint Joseph? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Saint Joseph that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find Bearings in Saint Joseph.

Kruse's Auto Center, LLC
(816) 364-5939
901 North 4th Street
St. Joseph, MO
Certifications
Blue Seal Certified
Membership Organizations
National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE)

Data Provided By:
Bob's Auto Repair
(816) 232-8979
1817 S 10th Street
Saint Joseph, MO
Services
Auto Service & Repair, Brakes Service & Repair
Products
Brakes, Front Ends

Firestone Complete Auto Care
(816) 233-5131
3805 Frederick Avenue
Saint Joseph, MO
Services
Auto Service & Repair, Brakes Service & Repair, Tires Wholesale & Manufacturers
Hours
M-Sa: 7: 00am-7: 00pm
Su: 8: 00am-5: 00pm
Payment Options
Debit Cards, American Express, Checks, MasterCard, Discover, Cash, VISA

Avenue Auto Sales & Service Inc
(816) 232-2710
4202 Saint Joseph Avenue
Saint Joseph, MO
Services
Auto Air Conditioning & Heating Service & Repair, Auto Service & Repair, Auto Tire Shop Equipment & Supplies, Used Cars
Hours
Mon-Sat

Leaverton Transmission
(816) 279-1134
829 South 10th Street
Saint Joseph, MO
 
Cornett Automotive Inc
(816) 233-4094
1225 N 4th Street
Saint Joseph, MO
Services
Auto Service & Repair, Brakes Service & Repair, Auto Tire Shop Equipment & Supplies
Products
Brakes & Suspensions
Payment Options
American Express, MasterCard, Discover, VISA

Belt Alignment & Frame
(816) 233-8680
3636 Messanie Street
Saint Joseph, MO
Services
Auto Service & Repair, Auto Oil & Lube, Brakes Service & Repair, Auto Tire Shop Equipment & Supplies, Auto Alignment Frames & Axles Service & Repair
Hours
Mon-Sat
Payment Options
Lay-A-Ways, 90 Days Same as Cash

Collision Repair Specialists
(816) 232-5886, 001-2004
3900 Frederick Avenue
Saint Joseph, MO
Certifications
Blue Seal Certified
Membership Organizations
National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE)

Data Provided By:
Wolf Specialized Drivetrain
(816) 364-1087
1302 N 6th St
Saint Joseph, MO
Services
Automotive Transmission

Brown Mike Autobody
(816) 279-6406
1611 Frederick Ave
Saint Joseph, MO
Services
Auto Body

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Back to Basics Bearings

Bearings are one of the most important parts inside an engine, so it’s important to understand their role in the overall operation of the engine, their design features, and how to install them properly. Engine bearings are a relatively inexpensive component compared to the cost of labor and many of the other parts that go into rebuilding an engine, but if one fails or causes a problem that results in a warranty claim, it can cost you plenty! So with that in mind, let’s review some of the basics about bearings.

Bearings actually have a variety of roles inside an engine, including:

Supporting the crankshaft and camshaft; Limiting the fore and aft movement of the crankshaft (this job belongs to the thrust bearing); Reducing friction; Lubricating the rotating shafts and connecting rods; Providing splash lubrication for the pistons, rings and cylinder walls (which also helps cool the pistons); Conducting heat away from the rotating parts; and Affecting how much oil pressure the engine develops at idle and higher rpms.

Basic design
Sleeve type bearings are used in most engines to support the crankshaft and camshaft. Most crankshaft main bearings are a two-piece (upper and lower) split shell design, while most cam bearings for pushrod engines are a one-piece full round design.

In overhead cam (OHC) engines, the cam bearings may be either type, or there may be no bearing inserts at all, i.e., the machined surface of the cam bores serve as the bearing surface for the cam(s).

Sleeve style wet bearings are used instead of ball bearings or roller bearings in most automotive applications because they are cheaper, lighter and are capable of supporting high loads. Even so, ball or roller bearings are sometimes used to support balance shafts in some engines, as well as the crankshaft in some motorcycle, marine and racing engines.

Though ball bearings and roller bearings are called "anti-friction" bearings because they spin easily and produce little drag, a rotating shaft supported on a film of oil inside a pressurized sleeve style bearing also spins with minimal resistance. The only drag on the shaft is that created by the shearing characteristics of the oil film. Also, the oil film helps spread the bearing load over a broader surface unlike a ball bearing or roller bearing, which concentrates the load at a single point or line.

At a microscopic level, oil molecules are like tiny ball bearings and glide easily past one another. That’s why oil feels slippery and makes such a good lubricant. And, the thinner the viscosity of the oil, the more easily it shears and the less friction and drag it creates. But, the oil must have a certain amount of viscosity so it can maintain film strength and not gush out of the bearing too quickly.

Temperature is also a factor to consider, too, because the hotter the oil gets the thinner it gets. If low viscosity oil is subjected to too much heat, it may not be able to maintain ad...

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3550 Embassy Parkway
Akron, OH 44333
330-670-1234 • (FAX) 330-670-0874